A Lifetime Hunt in Mississippi

It started with the ubiquitous 20-minute delay in leaving the tower at Energy Center 3 and that pervasive fire that would allegedly burn uncontrolled for the few days in my absence. My father idled outside the office’s doors. I extinguished the brush fire and jumped in the truck. “Sorry for the delay” I said, “I don’t think I have ever been able to get out when we have agreed.”

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Down to the Wire: A Story of a DIY Colorado Mule Deer Hunt

The next day was our last day to hunt for mule deer during Colorado’s 2nd Rifle Season. I pulled my beanie down over my eyes. The wind whipped around our tent as it gusted through the shallow gully choked in sagebrush.

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Raccoon Trapping: Homemade Water Resistant Bait for Dog-Proof Traps

Raccoon trapping can be a fun and inexpensive way to introduce trapping to younger generations.  By using dog-proof traps, the initial cost is low and the need for intricate trap setting and bedding methods are eliminated.  The wide-ranging diet of the raccoon allows the trapper to easily make his or her own bait. This year, my daughter and I did just that!  

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Paddling into Public Land: Using a Kayak to Hunt Whitetails on Public Land

Using a kayak, or some sort of small watercraft, doesn’t require too much effort, and it can really provide a significant advantage. As deer get more and more pressure from hunters during the season, they will use natural obstacles, such as rivers, to provide cover and solitude. By using a kayak or canoe, one doesn’t create much noise and doesn’t leave behind a trail of human odor. It can be a great way to sneak up close to bedding areas without alerting deer to your presence. 

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Coyote Trapping: Trap Modifications

Trapping eastern coyotes can be a challenge. Eastern coyotes tend to be slightly bigger than their cousins from the west. In some instances, they can weigh around 60lbs. In this video Dan talks about the modifications he does to his coilspring traps. These modifications help improve the speed of his traps and their holding power.

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Southern Supper: A Short Film About Bowhunting Pigs in Southeast Texas

While walking through one of the National Forests in east Texas, I came across an interesting thing.  I found a young loblolly pine, about 7” in diameter, that had mud caked onto the trunk reaching about 4’ off the ground. At the base of the tree, a large circular mud pit had been beaten into the ground. Pig tracks littered the ground all around the pine tree. I was new to Texas and new to hog hunting at the time, but this was unmistakably a point of interest for the pigs

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Bowhunting Over Abandoned Gas Wells

I left work early and headed into the Allegheny National Forest. It was early bow season in Pennsylvania and I couldn't wait for the evening hunt. Several days ago I had set my treestand in a large maple tree. The location of the stand was in a steep valley. On one side of the stand, a tributary to the Tionesta River flowed past. On the other the side, the steep ravine rose up from the valley floor.

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A Backcountry Hog Hunt in the Pineywoods of Texas

In the spring, Dan drove from Pennsylvania to Texas for a backpack-style pig hunt. Going into this hunt, we weren't expecting to backpack into a remote and secluded valley; Texas simply lacks the large tracts of public land that people often associate with backpack hunting. That being said, we still wanted to try and get off the beaten path as much as possible. We packed our bags and headed into the National Forest of eastern Texas where we hunted and camped for 5 days.

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Lesson Learned on the 2016-2017 Pennsylvania Trapline

Every weekday morning, the alarm would chime at 4:30 am. For most other circumstances I would be inclined to roll over and aimlessly smack at the snooze button. But during the weeks that I ran my trapline, the alarm-clock’s usually annoying chimes, were very much welcomed. Some days, I found myself up before the alarm sounded (I think my wife really appreciated those days).

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A Memorable October Hunt for Wood Ducks

Despite the cold October morning, I felt quite warm and comfortable as I fired-up the vehicle in the morning darkness.  Much to my delight, my girlfriend Ellen, chose to join me and my two friends, Dan and Ben, for a morning duck hunt on a tributary that flowed into the Allegheny River. It was still dark when Ellen and I pulled to the shoulder of the road, right behind Dan’s parked pickup.

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Finding the Time to Put-Up Fur - My Method of Freezing and Fleshing Pelts

The joys of successful trapping are accompanied with the trials of finding time for processing the animal. The pelt of the furbearer you harvested will be dried and either shipped off to a fur auction, sold to a buyer, or tanned for display. However, the joys of everyday life won’t provide the average person with adequate time for the skinning and fleshing process...

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Trapping My First River Otter

I was 16 years old when I started trapping in Minnesota. I knew there was something unique about it that hunting and fishing didn’t have. Unfortunately, no one in my family trapped, but I was lucky enough to have my friend’s father, Andy, teach me how to trap. I always enjoyed exploring the woods, fields, creeks, and marshes for animal sign, and trying to find the perfect place to set a trap with the correct bait and lure. Andy first taught me how to trap in the numerous lakes, streams, and rivers that Minnesota provides. 

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Best Trail-Cam Pics of 2016

There are several of us at RGT that have trail-cameras. We use these devices for a variety of reasons. They help us decide where and when to hunt a certain area, they are used as an aid in wildlife research, and sometimes we just enjoy seeing what critters are roaming the wilds when we aren't able to be there physically.

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Bloodhound

I have a treestand location that’s basically just outside my backdoor that I call “Wi-Fi”. This stand got its name because it is close enough to my house that I still get a wi-fi connection from the router.  Don’t let the fact that the stand skirts the tree line in my backyard fool you.  This stand gets a lot of use, and many game animals have been seen and harvested from it.  The close location of this stand to my house is extremely convenient, especially when time constraints from everyday life only allow for a short hunt after work.  Because of this, “Wi-Fi” is my go-to hunting spot on the weekdays

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Man vs. Beaver: A Short Film by JK Young

My friend, JK Young, filmed this short video a couple of years ago. We had a discussion about eating beaver meat and Jeff thought it would make for an entertaining short film. Beaver season was still in full swing, but all the other trapping seasons had come to a close in Pennsylvania. I had hung most of my traps up for the season, but we decided to make 4 sets along a local stream.

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Stalking Sus scrofa: A Tale of My First Successful Wild Pig Hunt

In the predawn darkness, the headlights of the Tacoma revealed a substantially washed-out section of dirt road. I switched the truck over to 4-wheel drive, and began driving forward over the unconsolidated sand and washed-out road. I continued on, carefully navigating around large logs and debris that had been deposited onto the road from the periodic flooding. In the past year, the Neches River had flooded much of the low-lying ground around Davy Crockett National Forest. The road abruptly came to a dead end and the headlights from the truck illuminated the moist green leaves of the forest.

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Cleaning and Preserving a Skull

Game animals not only provide pelts and meat, but they can also provide great home decoration. Recently I decided to clean and preserve a beaver skull from a 51 pounder that was caught this year. Cleaning skulls for presentation is really pretty easy. You just need to set aside some time to do it. The next time you have a memorable catch or hunt, consider preserving the animal’s skull for a great looking decorative piece.

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